Vreleks Forum Index Vreleks
The Alurhsa Word for Constructed: Creativity in both scripts and languages
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Holxws
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Vreleks Forum Index -> Conlangs
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Hemicomputer



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 610
Location: Calgary, Alberta

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2008 4:48 am    Post subject: Holxws Reply with quote

Phonology/Roman Orthography
Consonants:
/D T Z m X R\ n J l t N 4 j v S s k C j\ tS dZ tK dK\/ <d ț j m x h n l t g r y v c s k tc dj tl dl>

Vowels:
/@ u { A {u E e i aI OI O o U/ <u a e i o w>

Allophony:
[ u ] becomes [ w ] when it precedes another vowel E.g. rai [ 4{wi ]
[ v ] becomes [ f ] when adjacent to voiceless consonants, and [ B ] when word-final
[ 4 ] becomes [ r\ ] when it is the final letter in a word, or when followed by [ t, Z, S, tS, dZ ]

So, Holxws is pronounced [ ROlXUks ].

Stress Rules
Stress is normally places on the first syllable of the root, unaffected by prefixes (Eg: Tvrul /'tov4@l/, entvrul /wEn'tov4@l/). When the first syllable contains /E/ or /@/ or has a consonant nucleus, stress is shifted onto the second syllable (Eg: xnvor /Xn='vO4u/, evir /E'vir\/), unless the second syllable also contains /E/ or /@/. In that case it is kept on the first (Eg: geten /'NEtEn/).

To mark irregular stress, a system of diacritics is used. When stressed irregularly, vowels bearing no diacritic get the grave accent (e to , u to , etc.). Vowels with an accute get the umlaut ( to , to etc.). and do not change diacritics, but are doubled to show stress. This is usually used for foreign names (Eg: Jenny is written Djni), but some native words have is (Eg: To jump = oskẁr /Os'kUr\/).

Grammar
SOV with postpositions. Adjectives after their nouns, adverbs before their verbs. Tense is isolated and person is synthesized to the verb using suffixes. When the verb is in the third person and the person is specified by name, the verb does not take the a suffix. Eg: He/she eats=gljn, Sue eats= S glj NOT S gljn. Gender is not normally marked for pronouns, but there are ways to specify genders if it is important to the sentence. HE is= kmn mok, SHE is= kmn c. Mood is placed before a verb just like tense. If mood and tense are both present, tense goes before mood. More to come on the grammar.

Tenses
Tenses are marked with a tense particle preceding the verb.
The basic tenses are:
Far past-Xe
Near past-Xi
Near future-T
Far future-T
Present tense is not marked.

Some extra tenses are:
The "was going/about to" tenses:
Far past: S
Near past: Sa

the "will have" tenses:
Near future: M
Far future: M

The "have ___ before" tenses:
Near past: e
Far past: i
They refer to something having happened in the past, as opposed to relating a specific event. Eg: "Tst xe gljul"="I ate toast." The speaker is referring to a specific eating of toast. "Tst i gljul"="I have eaten toast." The speaker has, at some point in their life, eaten toast. Note that "tst e gljul" carries the specific implication "I have eaten toast recently."

Adding -s makes a tense imperative (this can be used as an actual command form or to indicate "have to".) Adding -t makes the tense progressive/continuous.
Present imperative is Les
Present progressive is Let

Questions
For asking questions where you are asking about the truth of a statement (Do we do this? Is he ok?), you add the question suffix - to the verb. Eg: Are you here?=o kmac? You are here=o kmac. For questions where you are inquiring to an unknown part of as statement (What do we do? How is he?), you replace the unknown word with one of various words (one for verbs, one for nouns, etc.) Eg: What do we do?=Migknulun?
The "unknown value" words are:
Migknu: for verbs
Ri: for adjectives
R: for adverbs
Tsol: for most nouns


Last edited by Hemicomputer on Fri Apr 24, 2009 6:28 am; edited 49 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Aeetlrcreejl



Joined: 08 Jun 2007
Posts: 839
Location: Over yonder

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2008 6:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That ain't no phonology.
_________________
Iwocw ĵọṭsk.
/iwotSwa_H d`Z`Ot`~asa_Hk/
[iocwa_H d`Z`Ot`_h~a_Hk]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
eldin raigmore
Admin


Joined: 03 May 2007
Posts: 1621
Location: SouthEast Michigan

PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2008 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you aware that in X-SAMPA (and Z-SAMPA and CXS), capital letters are not pronounced the same as the corresponding lowercase letters?
For instance:
< D > is like a voiced "th" in English "leather", while < d > is like most "d"s in English; for instance, that in "dog".

< S > is like a mute "sh" in English "wish", while < s > is like most "s"s in English, for instance, that in "silent".

< T > is like a mute "th" in English "theater", while < t > is almost like most "t"s in English, for instance, that in "total". (The first "t" in "total" is post-aspirated in most English dialects, though; it would be written < t_h > in X-SAMPA.)

< Z > is like the voiced "zh" sound in "measure", and in some dialects' pronunciation of the soft "g" in "garage"; but < z > is like most "z"s in English, such as the one in "zone".

Most of the other uppercase/lowercase pairs are also different.
Sometimes there are two different vowels; A and a, E and e, I and i, O and o, U and u, for instance. Sometimes one is a vowel and the other is a consonant, like V and v.

Some of the differences will be quite unexpected; K vs k, for instance.

Since the IPA chart has 106 pulmonic egressive consonants, not even counting the vowels, the non-pulmonic and/or non-egressive consonants (such as clicks), and the diacritical marks, you can see that 52 symbols aren't enough to cover them all; not even half enough. So almost every letter in the alphabet has to be used an average of almost four times with different meanings; this means you usually need two meanings for the capital letter that are different from the two meanings used for the lowercase letter. (The reason for "almost" and "usually" is that some of the symbols X-SAMPA uses aren't letter-based. They're based on numbers and/or punctuation symbols instead. If all 45 printable-character keys on the standard 108-key board were used, you could get 90 symbols just by using the shift key; but you'd still need diacritical marks to get the rest.)
_________________
"We're the healthiest horse in the glue factory" - Erskine Bowles, Co-Chairman of the deficit reduction commission
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hemicomputer



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 610
Location: Calgary, Alberta

PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 4:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

eldin raigmore wrote:
Are you aware that in X-SAMPA (and Z-SAMPA and CXS), capital letters are not pronounced the same as the corresponding lowercase letters?
For instance:
<D> is like a voiced "th" in English "leather", while <d> is like most "d"s in English; for instance, that in "dog".

<S> is like a mute "sh" in English "wish", while <s> is like most "s"s in English, for instance, that in "silent".

<T> is like a mute "th" in English "theater", while <t> is almost like most "t"s in English, for instance, that in "total". (The first "t" in "total" is post-aspirated in most English dialects, though; it would be written <t_h> in X-SAMPA.)

<Z> is like the voiced "zh" sound in "measure", and in some dialects' pronunciation of the soft "g" in "garage"; but <z> is like most "z"s in English, such as the one in "zone".


I am aware of the difference. The "d" was fully intended to be a voiced "th". Since the language does not contain the sound "d" makes in English, "d" was used to save space and to distinguish it from "th".

Same goes for the "s" and "z".
_________________
Bakram uso, mi abila, / del us bakrat, dahud bakrita!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
yssida



Joined: 16 Sep 2007
Posts: 253
Location: sa jaan lang

PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 5:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I get it. Your language doesn't distinguish stops from fricatives?
_________________
kasabot ka ani? aw di tingali ka bisaya mao na

my freewebs site
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
eldin raigmore
Admin


Joined: 03 May 2007
Posts: 1621
Location: SouthEast Michigan

PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 8:28 pm    Post subject: Re: New Gholhx Phonology (and rough sentence structure) Reply with quote

Thanks for the X-SAMPA.

Hemicomputer wrote:
And the word order is ObjActVerbTimeLocPrep, with adjectives after nouns and adverbs before verbs.


Hemicomputer wrote:
... ObjActVerb...

Is "Act" an abbreviation for "Actor"? the macro-role that contains the "Agent" role?
If so what is "Obj"? I'd expect it to be an abbreviation for "Object". The problem is, the other macro-role besides "Actor" is "Undergoer"; it contains the role of "Patient".
But "Object" is not a semantic role, case role, deep case, thematic role, nor theta-role; "Object" is a bunch of grammatical relations, namely, all GRs except "Subject".
So "Obj-Act-Verb-..." is not a very good way of specifying the dominant or unmarked or most-common "word"-order (order of meaningful constituents), unless you explain better what happens if the Object should happen to be the Actor, as it might be in a passive-voice sentence.
You may mean this language to have what's usually called "OSV" "word"-order; that is, the dominant, unmarked order of meaningful elements, in a main clause with two participants, when both the Agent and the Patient are full noun-phrases, has the Patient phrase before either the Agent phrase or the Verb; and has the Verb after both the Agent phrase and the Patient phrase.

Hemicomputer wrote:
...VerbTimeLocPrep, with ... adverbs before verbs.

Time and Loc would usually be adverbs, right?
Also, an adpositional phrase -- which is what I suppose "Prep" stands for -- is likely to "fill" either an "adjective slot" or an "adverb slot".
But it's part of the "word-order" type of your language, that it is Prepositional, rather than Postpositional or "other".

-----

Looks like you're making progress, refining your language. Keep it up, and keep us informed! Thanks.
_________________
"We're the healthiest horse in the glue factory" - Erskine Bowles, Co-Chairman of the deficit reduction commission
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hemicomputer



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 610
Location: Calgary, Alberta

PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 1:30 pm    Post subject: Re: New Gholhx Phonology (and rough sentence structure) Reply with quote

elden raigmore wrote:

Is "Act" an abbreviation for "Actor"? the macro-role that contains the "Agent" role?
If so what is "Obj"? I'd expect it to be an abbreviation for "Object". The problem is, the other macro-role besides "Actor" is "Undergoer"; it contains the role of "Patient".
But "Object" is not a semantic role...


This is what I meant when I said ROUGH word order. Very basic, preliminary stuff.

I'll have a better one when I learn what goes into a real gloss.
_________________
Bakram uso, mi abila, / del us bakrat, dahud bakrita!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
eldin raigmore
Admin


Joined: 03 May 2007
Posts: 1621
Location: SouthEast Michigan

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2008 9:42 pm    Post subject: Re: New Gholhx Phonology (and rough sentence structure) Reply with quote

Hemicomputer wrote:
I'll have a better one when I learn what goes into a real gloss.
What do you mean by "what goes into a real gloss"? Maybe I can help.
_________________
"We're the healthiest horse in the glue factory" - Erskine Bowles, Co-Chairman of the deficit reduction commission
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hemicomputer



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 610
Location: Calgary, Alberta

PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2008 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I mean how actual sentence structures are formed and other such basic linguistic principles.
_________________
Bakram uso, mi abila, / del us bakrat, dahud bakrita!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
eldin raigmore
Admin


Joined: 03 May 2007
Posts: 1621
Location: SouthEast Michigan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2008 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hemicomputer wrote:
I mean how actual sentence structures are formed and other such basic linguistic principles.
The best thing to do, probably, is just to start saying things.
You might look at
http://fiziwig.com/gsfa_1.txt
http://fiziwig.com/gsfa_2.txt
http://fiziwig.com/tazhu/mcguffey.html
1200 Graded Sentences for Analysis by Mary B. Rossman and Mary W. Mills, first published in 1922.
http://connection.ebscohost.com/content/article/1043208367.html;jsessionid=F761DB57C7686B5A43F0CC1D699929D6.ehctc1
http://www.potterpcs.net/gsfa/

Other popular texts include;

The first article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights;
http://daccessdds.un.org/doc/RESOLUTION/GEN/NR0/043/88/IMG/NR004388.pdf?OpenElement
"All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood."

Aesop's fable "The North Wind and the Sun"
http://ancienthistory.about.com/library/bl/bl_aesop_northwind_sun.htm
Aesop's Fables
Translated by George Fyler Townsend
The North Wind and the Sun
"THE NORTH WIND and the Sun disputed as to which was the most powerful, and agreed that he should be declared the victor who could first strip a wayfaring man of his clothes. The North Wind first tried his power and blew with all his might, but the keener his blasts, the closer the Traveler wrapped his cloak around him, until at last, resigning all hope of victory, the Wind called upon the Sun to see what he could do. The Sun suddenly shone out with all his warmth. The Traveler no sooner felt his genial rays than he took off one garment after another, and at last, fairly overcome with heat, undressed and bathed in a stream that lay in his path.

Persuasion is better than Force."

Genesis 11:1-9 (The Tower of Babel)
http://www.tribulation.com/prt_towr.htm
Genesis 11:1-9: The Tower of Babel

1 Now the whole Earth used the same language and
the same words.
2 And it came about as they journeyed east, that
they found a plain in the land of Shinar and
settled there.
3 And they said to one another, "Come, let us make
bricks and burn them thoroughly." And they used
brick for stone, and they used tar for mortar.
4 And they said, "Come, let us build for ourselves
a city, and a tower whose top will reach into
heaven, and let us make for ourselves a name; lest
we be scattered abroad over the face of the whole
earth."
5 And the LORD came down to see the city and the
tower which the sons of men had built.
6 And the LORD said, "Behold, they are one people,
and they all have the same language. And this is
what they began to do, and now nothing which they
purpose to do will be impossible for them."
7 "Come, let Us go down and there confuse their
language, that they may not understand one
another's speech."
8 So the LORD scattered them abroad from there
over the face of the whole earth; and they stopped
building the city.
9 Therefore its name was called Babel, because
there the LORD confused the language of the whole
earth; and from there the LORD scattered them
abroad over the face of the whole earth (Genesis
11:1-9 NAS).

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Also, there are certain popular word-lists to build up your lexicon.
The shortest is inadequate for conversation; it's the 207-word Swadesh list. But it is very popular.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swadesh_list#Swadesh_list_in_English

The shortest which is adequate for conversation, is the first 850 words of B.A.S.I.C. English by Charles K. Ogden (and I.A. Richards?).
http://ogden.basic-english.org/words.html

If you're afraid of using exactly the same "semantic map" to divide up semantic space as your L1 or some other natlang or other language you know, you might want to use the 1350-or-so Lojban gismu.
http://www.lojban.org/publications/wordlists/gismu_english_order.txt

And there are another few lists of 2000 to 5000 words each that are fairly popular among conlangers. Langmaker's "resources" section lists some.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Other ideas that might help:

Look up Matthew Dryer's "Clause Types" chapter in the Shopen anthology and try to translate one clause of each type.

Look in CONLANG-L for the 10-sentence-per-week translation exercises.

Actually develop a generative grammar for your language, and start making sentences from simplest to most complicated.

For instance;

Does a sentence necessarily consist of a subject and a predicate?
Does a predicate have to have a verb in it?
Is the object (if there is one) more tightly bound to the verb than anything else?

And so on.
_________________
"We're the healthiest horse in the glue factory" - Erskine Bowles, Co-Chairman of the deficit reduction commission
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hemicomputer



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 610
Location: Calgary, Alberta

PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2008 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you very much. I think I will just start saying things and have the language develop naturally.
_________________
Bakram uso, mi abila, / del us bakrat, dahud bakrita!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Serali
Admin


Joined: 18 Apr 2007
Posts: 929
Location: The Land Of Boingies

PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 3:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey!

Sorry for my long absence from here! Missed you guys alot. You can thank all the crap that's currently going on in my life for stressing me out and making me go deeper with in my depression.

Any way Eldin thanks for the links! This will be mighty useful for Klli since there's not much on it.


_________________


Tobo deu ne lenito sugu? - You kissed a frog?!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Hemicomputer



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 610
Location: Calgary, Alberta

PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2008 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As you can see, some HEAVY updates have been made. I've kind of run out of linguistic steam for now, so it's time to voice a concern: Is my language too complicated? It seems like there's a bit too much of everything. Please let me know what you all think.
_________________
Bakram uso, mi abila, / del us bakrat, dahud bakrita!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hemicomputer



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 610
Location: Calgary, Alberta

PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 3:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yssida wrote:
I get it. Your language doesn't distinguish stops from fricatives?


It does, but not for the voiced dental. There are voiced and voiceless dental fricatives, but for plosives there's only the voiceless.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dhanus
Admin


Joined: 06 Jul 2007
Posts: 192

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2008 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aeetlrcreejl wrote:
That ain't no phonology.


Instead of posting arrogant and unhelpful comments like you and other members on this forum (and others I might add) make, perhaps you could be more helpful and explain why "that ain't no phonology".

Also, sorry for the long absence, also.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
eldin raigmore
Admin


Joined: 03 May 2007
Posts: 1621
Location: SouthEast Michigan

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2008 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David wrote:
Aeetlrcreejl wrote:
That ain't no phonology.


Instead of posting arrogant and unhelpful comments like you and other members on this forum (and others I might add) make, perhaps you could be more helpful and explain why "that ain't no phonology".

Also, sorry for the long absence, also.
To me the remarks on phonology you have posted are closer to adequate than most people's first posts about their conlangs. They usually only include a phoneme inventory, whereas you have actually mentioned allophony.
Your remarks on allophony, however, are thus far incomplete (though IMO this is not a criticism so much as a request to see what you're going to do next). You have said what other phones the phonemes sometimes manifest as, but not under which circumstances they do so.
One thing that's completely missing from your phonology so far (though I, for one, assumed you'd get around to it) is phonotactics.
What pairs of phonemes can directly follow each other in what orders, and under what circumstances? And, when they do so, do either of them trigger allophony in the other?
What's your syllable structure look like?
Are there consonant phonemes that can only appear in syllable-onsets, never in syllable-codas? Are there consonant phonemes that can only appear in syllable-codas, never in syllable-onsets? Can any consonants appear as syllable nuclei or as parts of nuclei?
Can some consonants appear in onsets only as the first consonant? Or never as the first consonant? Or only as the last consonant? Or never as the last consonant?
Same question for codas instead of onsets.

Now, same questions for pairs of consonants instead of single consonants.

Can some phonemes only appear as the first segment of a word? Or only as the last segment of a word? Or never as the first segment? Or never as the last segment?

Does it make a difference what part-of-speech the word is?

Same questions for pairs of phonemes instead of phonemes.

What's the longest consonant-cluster that can appear as a syllable-onset?
What's the longest consonant-cluster that can appear as a syllable-coda?
What's the longest vowel-cluster that can appear as a syllable-nucleus?

What's the longest consonant-cluster that can appear in a word?
What's the longest vowel-cluster that can appear in a word?

Are there clusters (especially pairs, but also longer clusters) that can appear in a word, but only if they span a syllable-boundary (so that (if they're consonants) they're all or part of the coda of one syllable followed by all or part of the onset of the next syllable; or (if they're vowels) all or part of the nucleus of one open (coda-less) syllable followed by all or part of the nucleus of the next (onset-less) syllable).

What are the "Wickelphones" (sequences of three phonemes) that can appear in words in your language?
Are there any three-phoneme sequences which are forbidden even though the two-phoneme subsequences are allowed?
Which phonemes can constitute complete, one-phoneme words, all by themselves?
Which pairs of phonemes can begin words?
Which pairs of phonemes can end words?

Does the part-of-speech make any difference to the above?

Also ask all of the above questions for morphemes instead of words or syllables?

Does it make a difference whether the morphemes are roots?

----------------

What are the stress-patterns in your language?

Does the stressed or unstressed nature of a syllable make a difference to any of the questions above?

----------------

Once you've answered those questions I think your phonology will probably be complete.

Not all of the above questions are purely phonological; for instance some are "morpho-phonological", and some are about the interaction of prosody with phonology.

If there are other phonological questions that at least some people are at least sometimes interested in, they haven't occurred to me today.

-----------------

My personal humble opinion is that you've made a good start on phonology, and gone further than a start.

I look forward to more.

------------------------

And, of course, I like the S&S (Syntax and Semantics) parts of conlangs more than the P&P (Phonology and Prosody) parts. (Just my personal preference -- many share it but most don't.) So I will be interested in the morphology and syntax and pragmatics, in the phrases and clauses, especially in the multi-clausal sentences, and the mult-sentence constructions.

Hope to see some new stuff soon! Don't wait until you have most of these questions answered to post; post as soon as you have a paragraph or two of new material. I'll be interested, and I know others will too (though I don't know who or how many).
_________________
"We're the healthiest horse in the glue factory" - Erskine Bowles, Co-Chairman of the deficit reduction commission
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Aeetlrcreejl



Joined: 08 Jun 2007
Posts: 839
Location: Over yonder

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2008 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David wrote:
Aeetlrcreejl wrote:
That ain't no phonology.


Instead of posting arrogant and unhelpful comments like you and other members on this forum (and others I might add) make, perhaps you could be more helpful and explain why "that ain't no phonology".

Also, sorry for the long absence, also.


Sorry for that.

When I posted, I don't think it was quite complete. After all, he did edit it 37 times.

We've been waiting a long time for you, David. Welcome back. When will the collaborative conlang forum be back up again?
_________________
Iwocw ĵọṭsk.
/iwotSwa_H d`Z`Ot`~asa_Hk/
[iocwa_H d`Z`Ot`_h~a_Hk]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Hemicomputer



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 610
Location: Calgary, Alberta

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2008 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

eldin raigmore wrote:
To me the remarks on phonology you have posted are closer to adequate than most people's first posts about their conlangs. They usually only include a phoneme inventory, whereas you have actually mentioned allophony.
I wasn't that complete when I first posted this. I have been progressively editing the original post for every major change made to the language (hence the 37 edits that Aeelrcreejl mentioned.)
eldin raigmore wrote:
Your remarks on allophony, however, are thus far incomplete (though IMO this is not a criticism so much as a request to see what you're going to do next). You have said what other phones the phonemes sometimes manifest as, but not under which circumstances they do so.
I'll fix that, check the main post.
eldin raigmore wrote:
One thing that's completely missing from your phonology so far (though I, for one, assumed you'd get around to it) is phonotactics.
Ooo, phonotactics. Yeah, that's one of those many things that I'm not all that educated on. I'll look some stuff up and try to put together a logical phonotactic system.
eldin raigmore wrote:
What's your syllable structure look like?

I think it would be (C)(C)(C)V(V)(C)(C) or something similar.
eldin raigmore wrote:
Does it make a difference what part-of-speech the word is?
No. That much I know.
eldin raigmore wrote:
What's the longest consonant-cluster that can appear as a syllable-onset?
The longest so far is is /Xnv/ in "xnv" (to welcome.)
eldin raigmore wrote:
Does the part-of-speech make any difference to the above?
Again, no it does not.

eldin raigmore wrote:
What are the stress-patterns in your language?
Usually on the primary syllable of the root, I believe.

eldin raigmore wrote:
Once you've answered those questions I think your phonology will probably be complete.
Thank you!

eldin raigmore wrote:
My personal humble opinion is that you've made a good start on phonology, and gone further than a start.

I look forward to more.
Again, thanks.

eldin raigmore wrote:
And, of course, I like the S&S (Syntax and Semantics) parts of conlangs more than the P&P (Phonology and Prosody) parts. (Just my personal preference -- many share it but most don't.) So I will be interested in the morphology and syntax and pragmatics, in the phrases and clauses, especially in the multi-clausal sentences, and the mult-sentence constructions.

Hope to see some new stuff soon! Don't wait until you have most of these questions answered to post; post as soon as you have a paragraph or two of new material. I'll be interested, and I know others will too (though I don't know who or how many).
OK, I can see that I've got a lot to do. Expect some big improvement, but don't expect them soon.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
eldin raigmore
Admin


Joined: 03 May 2007
Posts: 1621
Location: SouthEast Michigan

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2008 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What's "participatory" tense?
And just because that reminds me: Do you have participles? How many kinds, and which kinds, and how do they get made?
_________________
"We're the healthiest horse in the glue factory" - Erskine Bowles, Co-Chairman of the deficit reduction commission
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hemicomputer



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 610
Location: Calgary, Alberta

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2008 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

<Obsolete>

Last edited by Hemicomputer on Wed Apr 01, 2009 3:29 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Vreleks Forum Index -> Conlangs
Goto page 1, 2  Next
All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group
Theme ACID 2003 par HEDONISM Web Hosting Directory


Start Your Own Video Sharing Site

Free Web Hosting | Free Forum Hosting | FlashWebHost.com | Image Hosting | Photo Gallery | FreeMarriage.com

Powered by PhpBBweb.com, setup your forum now!
For Support, visit Forums.BizHat.com