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The Alurhsa Word for Constructed: Creativity in both scripts and languages
 
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Unnamed Pretty Scripty

 
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Serali
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2011 5:05 am    Post subject: Unnamed Pretty Scripty Reply with quote

Something I had come up with after being inspired by another pretty scripty. This was like in 2009? Idk when but this photo (I got a camera!) was taken just now.

Believe it or not it's in English. ^________^



Sorry for hugeness, will edit later. And the crappy lighting is due to the fact it's night here. *^^*

Pweeeeeety scwiptyyyyyyyyy! Mr. Green


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eldin raigmore
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2011 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since you've told us it's in English, if I knew how many letters each word is, I could use ordinary cryptologic techniques to figure out the code. Or, at least, I could if I knew which parts of the words were letters.

Is it an alphabet? An alphasyllabary? An abugida? A pointed abjad? A syllabary?

If it's not an alphabet I wouldn't know how to decode it.

Assuming it's an alphabet, that little squiggle that's by itself at the beginning of the third line (counting the title as a line) and is the middle (second) word of the fifth line, is probably "a" if it's one letter, "of" if it's two.
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Serali
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2011 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

eldin raigmore wrote:
Since you've told us it's in English, if I knew how many letters each word is, I could use ordinary cryptologic techniques to figure out the code. Or, at least, I could if I knew which parts of the words were letters.

Is it an alphabet? An alphasyllabary? An abugida? A pointed abjad? A syllabary?

If it's not an alphabet I wouldn't know how to decode it.

Assuming it's an alphabet, that little squiggle that's by itself at the beginning of the third line (counting the title as a line) and is the middle (second) word of the fifth line, is probably "a" if it's one letter, "of" if it's two.


I guess you could say syllabary......Haven't really thought about it too much. I'll have to write some things up later. FUN!


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LingoDingo
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2011 2:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to point out something that seems to have been a base of a fair amount of confusion that I've seen in this section: Abugidas, and Alphasyllabaries are two names representing the same writing system and a Pointed Abjad is an Abjad that has been altered into an uncommonly used Abugida format.

Back to the topic, though, I think this is indeed a pretty-looking script. I'd like to see more about it.

=]
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Serali
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2011 7:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LingoDingo wrote:
Just to point out something that seems to have been a base of a fair amount of confusion that I've seen in this section: Abugidas, and Alphasyllabaries are two names representing the same writing system and a Pointed Abjad is an Abjad that has been altered into an uncommonly used Abugida format.

Back to the topic, though, I think this is indeed a pretty-looking script. I'd like to see more about it.

=]


Hmmm being that it could also be used as an alphabet I'm guessing that would make it a alphagida then? Idk.

I'll write something up tomorrow. And thank you! *^^* It's actually one of my personal faves. ♥


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Hemicomputer



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PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 10:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't see the image... Sad

EDIT: Never mind, the image decided to show up. I like it! Very clean appearance. It does seem kind of repetitive though; a lot of the characters look alike. The red/green coloration makes me wonder if this is a seasonal message you've written for us?

(P.S. I'm back! Hello!)
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eldin raigmore
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LingoDingo wrote:
Just to point out something that seems to have been a base of a fair amount of confusion that I've seen in this section:

Really? I hadn't noticed much confusion, (though I'm only one member).


LingoDingo wrote:
Abugidas, and Alphasyllabaries are two names representing the same writing system

Always? Or sometimes?

See:
in A MATTER OF TYPOLOGY: ALPHASYLLABARIES AND ABUGIDAS Studies in the Linguistic Sciences Volume 30, Number 1 (Spring 2000), William Bright (University of Colorado: william.bright@colorado.edu) wrote:
In the reference volume The World's Writing Systems, co-edited by Daniels & Bright 1996, the term 'alphasyllabary' is used in the chapters for which I was responsible, and 'abugida' in those for which Daniels was responsible. My position was that, although I recognized the aptness of Daniels's term, I felt a new term was unnecessary, since 'alphasyllabary' was familiar in the South Asian field. However, the following commentary was provided by Daniels (1996a:4, fa.):

Daniels wrote:
Bright' s alphasyllabary ... is apparently not intended as an equivalent of these functional terms [alphabet, abjad, abugida], but refers to the formal property of denoting vowels by marks that are not of the same status as consonants, and do not occur in a linear order corresponding to the temporal order of utterance.


I understand, then, that Daniels prefers a typology based on the 'functional' criterion of correspondence between sound and symbol, in particular the importance of the 'inherent' vowel and its replacement by other vowel symbols. But my own preference, which he calls 'formal', is for a typology which gives more attention to the graphic arrangement of symbols. For this purpose, I accept the terms 'alphabet' and 'abjad' as Daniels defines them; but in defining the alphasyllabary, I focus on the predominantly 'diacritic' status of the vowel symbols. It is understandable that some reviewers of the book have found the use of 'abugida' and 'alphasyllabary' to be problematic, as well as the related use of the term 'diacritic' (Segert 1996:408, Anderson 1997:307, Sproat 1998: 130).

To evaluate the alternative criteria employed by Daniels and myself, it may be useful to look at some other, less well-known writing systems of Asia. One of these is the 'Phags-pa script, developed by a Tibetan monk in the 13th century on the order of Kubla Khan, the emperor of China. The plan was to have an official script which would be used for all the major languages of the Chinese empire, including Tibetan, Uyghur, Mongolian, and Chinese. ....


An abugida has characters representing CV syllables with a particular, inherent vowel; and if you want to represent CV1 for some other vowel, there are diacritical marks on the characters that will do so.

Alphasyllabaries, OTOH, also have characters for certain individual phonemes; usually, that means, for stand-alone vowels; and often it means for stand-alone consonants as well or instead.
Alphasyllabaries are especially well-suited to languages in which almost all syllables are CV but there are syllables that are just V and/or there are some CVC syllables or some word-internal consonant clusters or both.

In an abugida if you want to write a stand-alone consonant there's a diacritical mark you use. Like the dot over the second in மரம்.

How you write stand-alone vowels in an abugida could vary.

Or am I wrong?

Anyway,
Omniglot wrote:
Syllabic alphabets

Syllabic alphabets, alphasyllabaries or abugidas consist of symbols for consonants and vowels. The consonants each have an inherent vowel which can be changed to another vowel or muted by means of diacritics. Vowels can also be written with separate letters when they occur at the beginning of a word or on their own.

When two or more consonants occur together, special conjunct symbols are often used which add the essential parts of first letter or letters in the sequence to the final letter.

seeming to suggest that "syllabic alphabet" and "alphasyllabary" and "abugida" are all synonymous, and
Wikipedia wrote:
An abugida /ˌɑːbuːˈɡiːdə/ (from Ge‘ez አቡጊዳ ’äbugida), also called an alphasyllabary, is a segmental writing system in which consonant–vowel sequences are written as a unit: each unit is based on a consonant letter, and vowel notation is obligatory but secondary. This contrasts with a full alphabet, in which vowels have status equal to consonants, and with an abjad, in which vowel marking is absent or optional.

The term abugida was suggested by Peter T. Daniels in his 1990 typology of writing systems. It is an Ethiopian name of the Ge‘ez script, ’ä bu gi da, taken from four letters of that script the way abecedary derives from Latin a be ce de. As Daniels used the word, an abugida contrasts with a syllabary, where letters with shared consonants or vowels show no particular resemblance to each another, and with an alphabet proper, where independent letters are used to denote both consonants and vowels. The term alphasyllabary was suggested for the Indic scripts in 1997 by William Bright, following South Asian linguistic usage, to convey the idea that "they share features of both alphabet and syllabary".

Abugidas were long considered to be syllabaries or intermediate between syllabaries and alphabets, and the term "syllabics" is retained in the name of Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics. Other terms that have been used include neosyllabary (Février 1959), pseudo-alphabet (Householder 1959), semisyllabary (Diringer 1968; a word which has other uses) and syllabic alphabet (Coulmas 1996; this term is also a synonym for syllabary).

(so they agree with you (though Bright and Daniels appear not to)),
and "Pointed Abjad"s are quite hard to find a definition of as a group, at least using that phrase, by searching or metasearching the internet.


LingoDingo wrote:
Back to the topic, though, I think this is indeed a pretty-looking script. I'd like to see more about it.

Oh, yes! Very Happy Cool What he said! Very much so!


Hemicomputer wrote:
.... I like it! Very clean appearance. It does seem kind of repetitive though; a lot of the characters look alike. The red/green coloration makes me wonder if this is a seasonal message you've written for us?

P.S. What he said, too.
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